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Welcome to Oak Allergy Season in Austin!

by |  April 3rd, 2015
  

Welcome to Oak Allergy Season in Austin!child sneezing 411

Austin is covered in a lovely blanket of yellow this week as the oak trees have turned their reproductive instincts into high gear. Those oak trees will be happily making lots of acorns. Meanwhile, we humans are suffering the consequences!

About 40% of kids (usually age five and up) and 10-30% of adults (usually young adults) suffer from seasonal allergies. A person’s body is irritated by the pollen, resulting in an itchy nose/eyes/throat, watery eye drainage, watery runny nose, a drip down the back of the throat, a hacking cough, and a feeling of being tired or fatigued. People who are extremely sensitive can have significant eyelid swelling, a flare up of eczema, or wheezing from it. In short: misery!

It takes several weeks for a particular pollen to blow through once it arrives. So we will be enduring this “yellow haze” for a couple more weeks.

Here are some things you can do if you or your child has an oak pollen allergy (or any other seasonal pollen issue):

  • Stay indoors and keep your windows closed! If your school-aged child suffers significantly from seasonal allergies, get a note from her doctor to excuse her from recess or other outdoor activities.
  • Clean yourself and your pet after being outside. The pollen will come right in with you on your shoes, clothes, and in your hair. And, your dog will be covered in it-especially if he likes to roll around in the grass.
  • The good news, most allergic medications are available without a prescription! First, try an over the counter antihistamine for relief (examples of brand names: Benadryl, Claritin, Zyrtec, Allegra). I prefer the non-sedating antihistamines (i.e. Claritin or Zyrtec) because they won’t make a child sleepy or zoned out and only need to be dosed once a day. Itchy or runny nose? Try the now over-the-counter steroid nasal sprays, Flonase or Nasacort. Yes, kids can use them! Itchy, red eyes? Try Zaditor eye drops. They do sting a little bit, but if your child is that miserable, he will probably let you put them in. If not, bribery is an option.
  • If your child is still suffering, come and visit us. There are some prescription options if nothing else is working.

 

Happy Spring!


411 Pediatrics

About

Dr. Ari Brown is a pediatrician and a mom. Dr. Brown is Board Certified and a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. She has been in private practice for over 20 years. Her passion to advocate for children and educate families extends beyond the office setting. She is the co-author the bestselling "411" parenting book series including Expecting 411: Clear Answers and Smart Advice for your Pregnancy, Baby 411, and Toddler 411. Dr. Brown has received several professional awards including the Ralph Feigin, MD Award for Professional Excellence, the prestigious Profiles in Power Award by the Austin Business Journal for her service to the community, Austin's Favorite Pediatrician by Austin Family Magazine, and Texas Monthly Magazine's Super Doctor.

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